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Author Topic: Camera for video gun review  (Read 395 times)

Offline Jaeger

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Camera for video gun review
« on: January 30, 2016, 05:49:57 AM »
I just got a new rifle and I am going to try my hand at doing both a written and video review of it, possibly for publication. 

I did not know whether to place this post/question here or in the product review section, but since I'm not sure yet whether the review will be positive(and if negative, I will NOT post it on this site) I am going to ask my question(s) here.

I operate alone and am in need of a video camera that I can mount on a tripod to do a video review of the new gun.  Later, I may need assistance in splicing? the video segments to produce the full review.  I am assuming that all the newer cameras are digital today.

It will need to have a very good sound pick up since a lot of the review will be done outside and I will be moving around and it is going to be still mounted (I will not have a camera man that can move around with me).  I'm not talking about walking all over the place,  just loading, raising and firing, describing it's features and operation and moving around the gun when it is on a bench.

My cell phone video is too short time wise, poor sound pick up and can't easily be mounted.

Do/will any of the "go-pro" type cameras fit the bill?  Or are they better left for other types of more "action" type videos?  I have no use for that beyond what I am going to do with this and future gun/product reviews.

Can anyone recommend a good video camera at a reasonable price, say under $500, preferably closer to $300 that fits the bill?

Thanks,

Jaeger
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 05:56:41 AM by Jaeger »
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Offline MI_Bowhunter

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Re: Camera for video gun review
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2016, 07:08:17 AM »
Go Pro is a nice cam but a little limited in features for what you want. They are designed as high definition action cams and are awesome in that capacity but if you wan't to be able zoom, change focus, have a dsplay screen etc. Then a plain ole handheld HD video camera will give you a lot more flexability for doing reviews.

I have a couple sport cams they are typically have pretty wide angle lenses and you cannot see what they are pointed at until you look at the footage. Some, including most if not all tbe Go Pro models, will work with a phone app to view what the cameras views but you still will not be able to change focus, depth of field, zoom etc.

If you want a camera you can strap to you head, chest, gun, bow etc and capture footage the Go Pro is going to be what you want. If you want to be able to zoom in and out, adjust focus, etc then there are better options.

I have a couple of the Contour Roam/Roam2 cams and they have been great but when mounted to my bow 30 yard shots look like the target is about a 100 yards away because of the wide.angle. I have another ATN Shot Trak cam that works much better because it has a fixed 3 or 4x lens. This one shows the targets gread but due to the fixed zoom is not good at all for anythjng close up. Neither of these cams have a viewfinder or an phone app to view the image prior to or during filming.
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Offline Jaeger

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Re: Camera for video gun review
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 05:12:35 AM »
MI, thanks,

You raised some issues/features that I had not considered or been aware of, such as depth of field, ability to easily view what is being recorded, changing focus.

Thanks, just getting started in the search for a cam, now I have a much better idea of what to look for.

Jaeger
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Offline MI_Bowhunter

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Re: Camera for video gun review
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 02:22:05 PM »
Ive posted videos here in that past I had made with both the cams I have.  I can send the links to you later, traveling now, if you want then for reference.
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Offline Madgomer

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Re: Camera for video gun review
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 06:41:15 PM »
I should probably have my wife or daughter respond to this post, as they're big camera buffs.  My wife has had several Canon cameras which take great stills and also decent quality video, the one thing I'm not sure of is the audio quality.  I believe they have auxiliary inputs so perhaps you could wear a clip-on mic to improve sound quality.  Will ask her about the models she has, but a couple of years back they were in the vicinity of 300-400 bucks - quality is probably better now for the same or less money.  Lighting conditions make a huge difference in your video quality, so keep that in mind too.  Outdoors, you'll want to be out of the shade (or have good artificial lighting) and on a calm day to minimize wind noise.  Here's the cool thing - you can merge video footage from a variety of sources - dedicated camera, GoPro, cell phone, etc.  My kids are all pretty handy with that stuff, splicing together different segments, adding background text or graphics, etc, and picked it all up as part of their high school curriculum.  Amazing to see the different things they learn.
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