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Author Topic: Fruit Trees  (Read 3918 times)

Offline Deerhead

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Fruit Trees
« on: January 27, 2016, 07:27:02 PM »
Split Toe and I were talking yesterday about how we wish we had planted fruit tree several years ago.  If we had they would be producing fruit giving us additional hunting spots. 

This leads me to some questions. Who has planted fruit trees? If so what did you plant and what type?  Were they effective in drawing deer onto you property?  Have you shot a deer while feeding on the fruit trees? 
Would you do it again?
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Offline Madgomer

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2016, 07:46:15 PM »
Have planted some here but haven't been able to gain any added traffic from them (they're not mature enough yet), however from past experience hunting on family & friend's places, and watching the old orchard behind our previous house, I can vouch for their value.  A diverse food crop is a good thing.  Fruit trees alone - OK, some value.  Fruit trees plus some clover plus some beans, etc - really a good draw over a wide span of the calendar.  The deer used to jump our backyard fence at night & eat up all the dropped apples - I'd never see them in the daylight, but then again we had two big loud (but harmless) dogs back there which would throw a fit if they saw one.  I say do it, just be sure to protect them from browsing & rubbing for a few years.  My next step is to try some chestnuts.  I have a large old traditional crabapple tree in back - they all get cleaned up too.

Duh - forgot to answer your question about varieties - I'd focus on apples, not sure the specific variety matters, might actually be wise to mix it up.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2016, 07:48:48 PM by Madgomer »
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Offline treefarmer

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2016, 08:33:03 PM »
Here in the Florida Panhandle, we have a hard pear called a Sand Pear.  They are very hard but have a good flavor.  They seem to be very hardy and usually make more fruit than most other fruit trees.  We can them for cobblers and make pear relish out of them but mostly the deer eat them.  They make a great spot to place a trail camera!  They are not a particularly fast growing tree but once they start bearing, they really draw the deer.
Something to consider if they will grow in your location.
Treefarmer

Offline MichiganLouie

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2016, 08:58:50 PM »
We had planted some apple and pear trees in our old house.  Seems like it took something like 6 or 7 years for them to bear fruit.  We lived in a subdivision, and never saw deer in the area.  Where we live right now, there are 4 apple trees that are old.  The deer do like the apples.  they are all different varieties, one starts ripening in august, and the last one, which I recognize as Red Delicious bears last (is also our worst producer)  All the apple trees are done bearing by the time our firearm deer season comes around.  I have also planted trees for each one of our 5 grandkids.  One is a peach, which bears very few peaches, and two pear trees that have not begun to bear fruit.  A crab apple that all of a sudden the deer have been hammering the fallen crab apples.  The last tree is an ornamental.  We did have another tree that a young buck just about girdled it and I was able to bring it back, but another buck got to it and did a job on it.  Since then, I put 5' cages around the pear trees.  The deer don't seem to bother the peach tree.  We also have quite a bit of clover behind the house, which the deer seemed to come in at night for a snack, but I have started a garden in that spot.  The clover has spread to other areas, too.
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Online Puddle Jumper

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2016, 06:25:14 AM »
Planted Apple, Pear, Plum, China Jujube, China Chestnuts, American Hazelnut, and Persimmon.  Wild crabapples already growing in woods.  All the above planted near food plots.  Has only been a few years, Plums and Pears are producing but not much.  Takes awhile for them to grow, especially on coastal sandy soil.

My grandchildren should be able to enjoy.    ;D


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Offline russcat

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2016, 08:18:49 AM »
since being here on TalkHunting my eyes have been opened on things like this.  Pre-talkhunting I would have never have thought about fruit trees as a means to improve habitat.

If I were able to buy hunting land or know for sure I was leasing a place long term I would plant fruit trees immediately.  But since we lost our deer lease a few years ago we have been bouncing around trying to find another long term place.  So currently fruit trees are not in the plan for us.
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Offline NWIAdeerhunter

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2016, 08:54:15 AM »
Back when I worked for the state park, and nights doing "security" we would drive around the park and the parks other properties and video deer in velvet. A neighbor of one of the newer properties had an apple orchard right next to the road and there would be a nice buck or even batchalor group eating apples almost nightly.  But be cautious of the variety you plant because I do know that there is one variety for sure that needs another tree to produce apples, I don't remember what that variety is right now. 
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Offline wvwhitetail

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2016, 12:41:56 PM »
It really surprised me to hear Pear mentioned a lot of times. When I was raising whitetail I had several opportunities to pick up fallen pears and to take home to my deer. I finally quit doing it because they wouldnt touch them. I blew it off as it was something they was not accustomed with cause I have seen deer eat them in the wild. 

Offline wvwhitetail

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2016, 12:44:18 PM »
Back when I worked for the state park, and nights doing "security" we would drive around the park and the parks other properties and video deer in velvet. A neighbor of one of the newer properties had an apple orchard right next to the road and there would be a nice buck or even batchalor group eating apples almost nightly.  But be cautious of the variety you plant because I do know that there is one variety for sure that needs another tree to produce apples, I don't remember what that variety is right now.

A lot of fruit trees are  in need of cross-pollination. Make sure to read up before buying.

Offline BLUETOE

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2016, 02:46:28 PM »
It really surprised me to hear Pear mentioned a lot of times. When I was raising whitetail I had several opportunities to pick up fallen pears and to take home to my deer. I finally quit doing it because they wouldnt touch them. I blew it off as it was something they was not accustomed with cause I have seen deer eat them in the wild.
They usually don't hit the pears until after a frost WVW at least that the way it is with the deer pears. I have 1 tree by my box blind and the deer tear them up after the first frost the squirrels start on them about the first of Oct.
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Offline buckone1

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2016, 03:15:01 PM »
We planted apple tree's some12 years ago and the deer live in the yard in the fall.
Between the deer and the squirrels we don't stand a chance on getting to eat any!

We are going to plant several crab apple tree's this spring.Maybe some chestnuts too!
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Offline yari

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2016, 05:00:11 PM »
all I can say is YES YES YES. I have 2 deer seasons at my place. the early season is apple deer season and the second is food plot deer season. when I had a lot of deer, pre-wolves, I would have herds of deer coming at all times of the day. it was amazing. now I still believe I pull deer from miles just to get my apples, there just aren't many left.

first, make should you buy your trees within 100 miles of where you will plant. 2nd make sure you buy the right tree zone. 3rd, use tree tubes(this will accelerate your group exponentially) 4th you also need to fence them. 5th plant them in the open. they don't like shade. 6th fertilizer helps. if you can, mulch to keep down weed completion.

did I forget anything? the best time to plant a tree is 10 years ago. i'm planting 50 white pines this spring for a buffer from the road. I should have done this 10 years ago and I would have had a barrier already   good luck
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Offline dave 1211

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2016, 05:04:41 PM »
Dunston chessnuts  is what I planted
turkey season was a wet one now on to deer hunting in October





dave 1211

Offline Madgomer

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2016, 05:53:49 PM »
all I can say is YES YES YES. I have 2 deer seasons at my place. the early season is apple deer season and the second is food plot deer season. when I had a lot of deer, pre-wolves, I would have herds of deer coming at all times of the day. it was amazing. now I still believe I pull deer from miles just to get my apples, there just aren't many left.

first, make should you buy your trees within 100 miles of where you will plant. 2nd make sure you buy the right tree zone. 3rd, use tree tubes(this will accelerate your group exponentially) 4th you also need to fence them. 5th plant them in the open. they don't like shade. 6th fertilizer helps. if you can, mulch to keep down weed completion.

did I forget anything? the best time to plant a tree is 10 years ago. i'm planting 50 white pines this spring for a buffer from the road. I should have done this 10 years ago and I would have had a barrier already   good luck
Well stated Yari - I agree with you on all points.
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Offline ZLong19

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Re: Fruit Trees
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2016, 07:46:10 AM »
We have a variety at the house... one acre of apples bordered by an acre of crabapples, then a foodplot, on the edge of that foodplot we have 15 acres of sawtooths planted that started massing this year. Of course with sawtooths, they're the first nut to drop and it's usually before season therefore the reason behind a 15 acre flat of them. Other side of the property we plant about a 2 acre plot surrounded on the interior by hybrid white/sawtooth trees. They haven't starting massing yet, but hopefully will this year. We also have a few apple trees over there to go along with standing beans, corn and winter wheat. The best thing to do with planting stuff for deer is plant the biggest variety of everything you can afford. Wood Goats eat pretty much everything and if you can give them all they want in one spot they are less likely to wander across other properties.
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