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Author Topic: question for the archer  (Read 1230 times)

Offline dave 1211

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question for the archer
« on: February 18, 2013, 07:42:36 PM »
we all know that each gun like a certain bullet  ex ( 150 grain  one will shoot great out of the gun)  do you think this could be true of bows  was think about this  what do you all think
turkey season was a wet one now on to deer hunting in October





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Offline CTARCHER

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2013, 09:55:51 PM »
 ##$%#1119 Never thought of comparing different arrow/broadhead combinations for better accuracy. Could be a little costly I would think. Sure wouldn't mind trying if it would make a difference.
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Offline 5114TX

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 08:59:18 AM »
Without a doubt it makes a difference!!!    Searching for the exact set-up that works best for you  can be a little costly, but it's well worth the time and money.   If you don't have the optimum set-up, you're cheating yourself.    There are so many variables when it comes to bowhunting, and any slight variation can make a world of difference.   Changing a bow string, trying different broadheads, different types of releases, different arrows, fletchings, etc. until you find that exact, perfect set-up is a labor of love, but you owe it to yourself, and to the game you hunt.   
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Offline Snortweeze

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 01:15:25 PM »
It makes a big difference. That is why they offer several different tip sizes.
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Offline yari

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2013, 05:42:09 PM »
all the variables are important. personally i like a bigger arrow(cx 400) even though all i really need is a 300. i like the more stability and the wt. isn't that big of a factor for me.

see what shoots best for you. good luck
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Offline NWIAdeerhunter

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2013, 07:27:34 PM »
all the variables are important. personally i like a bigger arrow(cx 400) even though all i really need is a 300. i like the more stability and the wt. isn't that big of a factor for me.

see what shoots best for you. good luck

Yari, can I ask what your draw length and poundage is.  When u say you shoot a 400 arrow what do you mean?  Reason I ask is many people when they get set up they get the wrong arrow to begin with.  Arrows that say 400 on them aren't exactly bigger then ones that say 300.  the numbers are actually the spine stiffness of the arrow not size, and its actually the opposite of what most people think,  the smaller the number they stiffer they are, meaning people shooting a 29 inch draw and 70 lbs should be shooting a 340 spine stiffness arrow. shorter draw lengths should be shooting 400.  there are the exceptions to the rule though and that is found out through paper tuning. You probably know this already but its good information for someone beginning in archery.
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Offline Duane72

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2013, 07:48:33 PM »
Sure does... look at any arrow manufacturer's website and you'll see a miriad of info on which arrow is best for which length, broadhead weight, etc. That puts you inthe ballpark, but you have to play some before hitting the homerun.
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Offline Woods Walker

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2013, 08:39:35 PM »
I also agree that is definitely does make a difference.

And as a traditional archer it can get even more complicated because in addition to spine, draw length and other factor we also have different shooting styles that we  use in addition to using our fingers. Split finger, three under, shallow hook, deep hook, swing draw, set arm, push pull, cant/no cant, gap, instinctive, etc.

But that's what makes it fun!

The other point is that with traditional there's really not all that much to account for on the bow itself, especially if you shoot off the shelf like I do. Once you have the right spine, and you adjust your brace height and nock point to what best suits you, then all the other adjustments are with yourself. That's easier to fix and a LOT cheaper!!!

Most of us try to shoot the heaviest arrow/broadhead combo that we can accurately shoot, because with the physics of a traditional bow what kills is penetration and QUIET. Speed is a distant 3rd.
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Offline dave 1211

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2013, 09:58:33 PM »
this is what i like everyone got good info  and   shares it       i done archery for 36 year, Fletch my arrows and ran a bow shop with my bother. I also shot in the nation field archery "censored Word". tournaments including the world,  mid Atlantic and new york state.     so i love it when we can talk bow and arrows   thanks gang    @--0--0118
turkey season was a wet one now on to deer hunting in October





dave 1211

Offline yari

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2013, 07:02:47 PM »
all the variables are important. personally i like a bigger arrow(cx 400) even though all i really need is a 300. i like the more stability and the wt. isn't that big of a factor for me.

see what shoots best for you. good luck

Yari, can I ask what your draw length and poundage is.  When u say you shoot a 400 arrow what do you mean?  Reason I ask is many people when they get set up they get the wrong arrow to begin with.  Arrows that say 400 on them aren't exactly bigger then ones that say 300.  the numbers are actually the spine stiffness of the arrow not size, and its actually the opposite of what most people think,  the smaller the number they stiffer they are, meaning people shooting a 29 inch draw and 70 lbs should be shooting a 340 spine stiffness arrow. shorter draw lengths should be shooting 400.  there are the exceptions to the rule though and that is found out through paper tuning. You probably know this already but its good information for someone beginning in archery.

NWI, i shoot CX 400(carbon express). 70 lbs and a 28 1/2" draw. according to the charts, i could go down to a lighter CX300. the 400's are a few grams/inch heavier than the 300's so i would guess they are tougher.(more wt=more durable in my mind) i paper tune at the beginning of summer and before hunting season. it's a beautiful dart hole. feel free to express you opinion.
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Offline HoytShooter

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Re: question for the archer
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2013, 07:55:55 AM »
all the variables are important. personally i like a bigger arrow(cx 400) even though all i really need is a 300. i like the more stability and the wt. isn't that big of a factor for me.

see what shoots best for you. good luck

Yari, can I ask what your draw length and poundage is.  When u say you shoot a 400 arrow what do you mean?  Reason I ask is many people when they get set up they get the wrong arrow to begin with.  Arrows that say 400 on them aren't exactly bigger then ones that say 300.  the numbers are actually the spine stiffness of the arrow not size, and its actually the opposite of what most people think,  the smaller the number they stiffer they are, meaning people shooting a 29 inch draw and 70 lbs should be shooting a 340 spine stiffness arrow. shorter draw lengths should be shooting 400.  there are the exceptions to the rule though and that is found out through paper tuning. You probably know this already but its good information for someone beginning in archery.

NWI, i shoot CX 400(carbon express). 70 lbs and a 28 1/2" draw. according to the charts, i could go down to a lighter CX300. the 400's are a few grams/inch heavier than the 300's so i would guess they are tougher.(more wt=more durable in my mind) i paper tune at the beginning of summer and before hunting season. it's a beautiful dart hole. feel free to express you opinion.

Yari,
  I do believe you are correct.  With CE they run the numbers different than some.  A 300 arrow is a weaker spine than the 400.  I too run a little over spined and I have found the bow shoots better that way.  I would NEVER suggest anyone shoot under spined but over has never been an issue.  It also does give you the extra weight as you mentioned.
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