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Author Topic: Question for management......  (Read 971 times)

Offline ghost

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Question for management......
« on: February 27, 2010, 07:34:02 PM »
I know we're trying to bring back the population of turkeys in La, and it's working slowly but surely. My question is, out of a normal nest of eggs, what is the average tom to hen ration that will be produced. Additionally, is there anything that can be done to help increase the number of toms produced?  @--0--0104
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Offline cobrican

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2010, 08:38:09 PM »
well............ Nature will dictate most of that.  The ratio has alot to do with population.  Nature will bring a species to a healthy ratio, barring any outside influences.  Another large factor is Luck.  A brood may be anywhere from six to a dozen poults.  In most cases, I think we're lucky if half of those survive the first year.  Inclimate weather conditions, predators, fire (both wild and prescribed, and a slew of other natural factors cause early termination of young'ens.  In most cases, there will be more hens in a brood than gobblers.  That is the nature of the species.  I believe that one of the greatest influences we can have on our turkey population is active management.  Most of us manage for deer, but view turkeys as a by-product of deer management.  While that can happen, we can do more.  Prescribed fire in a pine forest is excellent for turkeys.  Also planting crops that turkeys can thrive in.  Most of us can mix in a good grain with our clovers and help out alot.  Helping to reduce predation in your area will also help.  I think your best bet for more Toms is to increase the overall number of turkeys in the area.  Work on the whole population.
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Online BeaglePup

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2010, 08:43:54 PM »
well............ Nature will dictate most of that.  The ratio has alot to do with population.  Nature will bring a species to a healthy ratio, barring any outside influences.  Another large factor is Luck.  A brood may be anywhere from six to a dozen poults.  In most cases, I think we're lucky if half of those survive the first year.  Inclimate weather conditions, predators, fire (both wild and prescribed, and a slew of other natural factors cause early termination of young'ens.  In most cases, there will be more hens in a brood than gobblers.  That is the nature of the species.  I believe that one of the greatest influences we can have on our turkey population is active management.  Most of us manage for deer, but view turkeys as a by-product of deer management.  While that can happen, we can do more.  Prescribed fire in a pine forest is excellent for turkeys.  Also planting crops that turkeys can thrive in.  Most of us can mix in a good grain with our clovers and help out alot.  Helping to reduce predation in your area will also help.  I think your best bet for more Toms is to increase the overall number of turkeys in the area.  Work on the whole population.

Well said and I agree.  If you want more information on Turkey Management as a whole or in your area FGO to the National Wild Turkey Federation web site.  THey have great info there and contact information for Local clubs in your area.
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Offline rhawkins

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2010, 09:49:49 PM »
Mother nature will take care of the boy girl ratio. 
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Offline DPD

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 01:16:47 PM »
tough question...need a state biologist for the ratio,  I know NY had a very successful program, we started with just a few turkeys in the alleghanys near PA (probably PA turks) and transfered them around the state for a few years.....now their is turkey everywhere you go and even in the adirondacks where we were told they wouldnt survive but their there in great populations now....I've seen as many as 15 eggs in a nest but I dont know the ratio @--0--0117
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Offline snapper

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 01:29:05 PM »
I agree with all that was said but in our area predation is the worst enemy of a young turkey . Have seen broods go from many to one or two to six weeks

Offline BubbaBrown

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2010, 01:32:19 PM »
well............ Nature will dictate most of that.  The ratio has alot to do with population.  Nature will bring a species to a healthy ratio, barring any outside influences.  Another large factor is Luck.  A brood may be anywhere from six to a dozen poults.  In most cases, I think we're lucky if half of those survive the first year.  Inclimate weather conditions, predators, fire (both wild and prescribed, and a slew of other natural factors cause early termination of young'ens.  In most cases, there will be more hens in a brood than gobblers.  That is the nature of the species.  I believe that one of the greatest influences we can have on our turkey population is active management.  Most of us manage for deer, but view turkeys as a by-product of deer management.  While that can happen, we can do more.  Prescribed fire in a pine forest is excellent for turkeys.  Also planting crops that turkeys can thrive in.  Most of us can mix in a good grain with our clovers and help out alot.  Helping to reduce predation in your area will also help.  I think your best bet for more Toms is to increase the overall number of turkeys in the area.  Work on the whole population.

Well said cobrican, you have to manage for turkeys, if you want a good turkey population on your hunting property.
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Offline hawghunter65

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2010, 04:34:01 PM »
i would imagine that female chicks outnumber the male chicks as in most species but do not know the exact ratio.  remember male chicks leave the female hen in the fall but the female chicks leave in the spring.  hence, one of the reasons male jakes are more apt to be killed when young without the female hens protection.  worst enemy of turkeys is the raccoon which find the nests and eat them.  control coon, fox, and coyote populations and leave a nesting field for protection with cover that chicks can escape in.


 @--0--0138
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Offline Possum

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Question for management......
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2010, 08:48:43 PM »
Hey I went over to the Hunting Club this weekend to take a look at my Food Plot or what's left of it...
It looked like someone had mowed over the 1 1/2 Acre plot with a Lawn mower on the number 2 low setting...
The clover looked great and the Turkey's had fertilized one end of it to the other (Turkey Poop)
I almost went back home and grab my Trail Camera's to set back out....
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Offline cowmanhunter

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2010, 07:53:59 AM »
As hawghunter said predator control especially coons is very important. On one property here in Florida over 500 coons was removed and the turkey population doubled in a single year, so yeh its important.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 08:00:22 AM by cowmanhunter »
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Offline ghost

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Re: Question for management......
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2010, 09:21:08 AM »
Like cobrican said I'm trying to manage for deer and do what I can for the turkeys I see on my property as I am not an avid turkey hunter. So my interest are mainly for educational purposes. Being a landowner I want to do what ever I can to help all the wildlife on my land so I can enjoy watching, harvesting and passing them on to my kids and grandkids.
Appreciate all the info.
Courage is not about medals.
It's simple, you run towards the gun fire not away from it.     Semper Fi....

 

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